Blessed are the sat upon,
the spat upon,
the ratted on...
-Simon and Garfunkel, “Blessed,” from the album Sounds of Silence

The life of heaven- the life of the realm where God is already king- is to become the life
of the world, transforming the present “earth” into the place of beauty and delight that
God always intended. And those who follow Jesus are to begin to live by this rule here
and now. That’s the point of the Sermon on the Mount... [It’s] a summons to live in the
present in the way that will make sense in God’s promised future; because that future
has arrived in the present in Jesus of Nazareth.
-N.T. Wright

 

Jesus’ “Sermon on the Mount” contains some of the most famous teachings in human history, and many people, regardless of belief or background, think of the Sermon on the Mount as pie-in-the-sky-platitudes. Jesus’ most famous sermon, however, is much more: it is his magnum opus on what flourishing life is like under God’s rule, his manifesto for his movement of followers.

The Sermon on the Mount is Jesus’ signature teaching on what spirituality and sex, money and worry and relationships and more look like in God’s kingdom. So, whether you’re just beginning to consider Christian faith, or are a seasoned follower of Jesus, plan to join us on Sundays as we listen together to the greatest sermon ever!

Miss a week? Listen to sermons from this series, and to past series here 


 

Recommended Resources

If you’d like to explore the Sermon on the Mount more deeply, here are some of the best books on the best sermon...

The Cost of Discipleship- Dietrich Bonhoeffer. Bonhoeffer was a 20th-century German Christian thinker and leader who opposed the Nazi regime out of allegiance to Jesus Christ, eventually at the cost of his own life. This book, his masterpiece on Christian discipleship, features an extended exploration on the Sermon on the Mount.

Matthew for Everyone (pt. 1)- NT Wright. This is the first half of a two-part commentary on Matthew by the world’s leading New Testament scholar; it’s learned without being stuffy, and accessible without being simplistic, and would be a wise companion as you explore Jesus’ teachings in his most famous sermon.

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